Motivation in Language Learning

This is a transcript of one of my YouTube Videos – To keep up with my latest thoughts on language learning, subscribe to my YouTube Channel. This one will help you find your motivation in language learning.

Hi there, Steve Kaufmann here. Today, I want to talk about motivation in language learning. You know, I have bought lots of books about language instruction, language acquisition. I have them on my shelves, I’ve read them. Some of them have influenced me, some of them I find totally contradicting my experience, but very little, I have found, has been written on the subject of motivating people.

Yet, I believe that motivation is the most important factor in language learning, so I want a talk a bit today about it. Maybe I’ll do a few videos on the subject of what motivates me from my experience and then I’d like to hear from you and then I have some other ideas about how in language instruction we could do a better job of trying to find those trigger points, those hooks that are going to motivate people and different people are motivated in different ways.

I thought of this today because I was cleaning out my garage. We changed our telephone system, got rid of our old TV, great, big, heavy TV, we even changed our central vacuum cleaner. I’ve got to get rid of all this stuff, so I look up the recycle centers here and find out where I go to take this stuff. I take it there and there’s some free recycling run by the city and adjacent to it and part of this complex is this company that takes in all these electrical or electronic goods, old hi-fi’s and everything else. Whatever they’re able to salvage out of them, they salvage. It’s a business, which is good.

Low and behold, everybody working there is Korean. The girl who’s there to receive me and who I asked my question of she’s Korean, so we start speaking in Korean. She was so happy and really, “Wow! You speak so well.” Of course, I don’t. So that motivated me and I said I’m going to back to Korean. I’ve got to get further along in Korean. So there was just a little spark like that. Prior to that, somebody on the YouTube channel had commented, “Looking forward to hearing you speak Polish.” I’ve been letting the Polish lag, so that was a bit of a motivator. In my own experience, those things aren’t strong enough. They’ll get me going for a while, but I have to have that good content.

I should point out, too, last week I traveled to the interior of BC and in the summer if you have the opportunity to travel by car in the interior of BC it is spectacular! So we drove across the Coast Mountains into Kelowna, this beautiful lake in the Okanagan, which is a different climate zone, different type of forest cover and stuff, drier. Visited with a couple in their mid 80s, whom we’ve known for a long time who have moved up there. The fellow, he’s 86 or 87 and he’s still learning Spanish. Then we drove down through Penticton, Okanagan Falls down to Osoyoos.

That country is so beautiful: the vineyards, the fruit orchards. We played golf and visited some vineyards where there’s free wine tasting. We bought some delicious wine. There’s a small winery called Cassini and we went in there, sampled different wines and we decided to buy two cases, like six bottles each of four different wines. We just had some this evening with dinner, a Cera, it was phenomenal! The owner showed up one day while we carting our two boxes away and he’s of Italian origin but lived in Romania, so I spoke a few words of Romanian. There’s a motivation. But, as I say, that is a small motivator. It’s not good enough, I need content of substance.

I’ve been reading this book ________ in Spanish. It’s such a fascinating book I just keep reading and I know that by reading in Spanish, I am continuing to improve my Spanish. It was only 10 years ago that I read my first whole book in Spanish. I haven’t really been working that much at Spanish, but reading more books, plus learning other languages my Spanish has improved. I was able to read the book almost as if it were English. So the big issue remains content.

I’m still attracted to my Russian and Ukrainian. I’m following the events there, so every day I listen to my Russian and Ukrainian and I don’t have the time to go after my Korean. You can get stimulated, that sort of little spark of motivation, but then I need some interesting content to keep me going.

So I’m going to stop it here, but I want to talk next time about how we can determine what motivated people and how that could be introduced into teaching. If people have ideas on that, I would love to hear from them. So thank you for listening, bye for now.

 

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